Feeds:
Posts
Comments

 

Author’s note:  I don’t claim to be good at poetry, but I find it therapeutic and have to file them somewhere.  This one is still a work in progress.

 

The Pool is my Temple

 

My arms pull and glide

legs dangling behind a tadpole

blue and white above clouds float by

Breathe… breathe

Try not to snap at butterfly guy

who tells me I go slow

doesn’t he know it’s therapy hour

Breathe…

Help doc with his last few feet

the dude has MS, and really

I don’t know how he does it

Breathe… breathe

Matt cannonballs beside

splashing me with joy always

oblivious to the world outside

Breathe…

Sobbing, they pat me on the back

and give me cherries to eat

staining their fresh white towels red

Kids look at me funny

as a grown man puts on

a life vest just as they learn how to swim

Fight… fight

Hobble out a three-legged mess

and back again tomorrow

legs dangling behind, a merman

Blue and white above

clouds float by

The pool is my temple

Breathe

Breathe.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

No Little Gifts

8 Hours

 

As my Lyme’s disease decreases my energy so that I am forced to contemplate purposely doing less, I was reminded of an unpublished portion of my Humility manuscript click here that had to be cut for the sake of space.  I hope it encourages others who also can only do so much:

 

“Grace was given to each one of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift”

~ Ephesians 4:7

 

Sometimes, we get discouraged and fail to do what we can because we think it is not good enough. You are not called to have greater gifts than what you have; only to be faithful to the measure God has given you. Not everyone can write a dozen books, or fix a score of mercy meals, or bear five children. We are to walk in the good works God has prepared for us, and no more (cf. Ephesians 2:10). That also means we show kindness and mercy to others as they are faithful to the measure God has given them. One of my favorite, and oft overlooked, episodes in JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy comes towards the end, as King Aragorn leads the united army of Rohan and Gohan in their march towards the dreadful Black Gate of Mordor. As they approach the gate, Tolkein writes:

So time and the hopeless journey wore away. Upon the fourth day from the Cross-roads and the sixth from Minas Tirith they came at last to the end of the living lands, and began to pass into the desolation that lay before the gates of the Pass of Cirith Gorgor; and they could descry the marshes and the desert that stretched north and west to the Emyn Muil. So desolate were those places and so deep the horror that lay on them that some of the host were unmanned, and they could neither walk nor ride further north.

Aragorn looked at them, and there was pity in his eyes rather than wrath; for these were young men from Rohan, from Westfold far away, or husbandmen from Lossarnach, and to them Mordor had been from childhood a name of evil, and yet unreal, a legend that had no part in their simple life; and now they walked like men in a hideous dream made true, and they understood not this war nor why fate should lead them to such a pass.

‘Go!’ said Aragorn. ‘But keep what honour you may, and do not run! And there is a task which you may attempt and so be not wholly shamed. Take your way south-west till you come to Cair Andros, and if that is still held by enemies, as I think, then re-take it, if you can; and hold it to the last in defence of Gondor and Rohan!’[1]

I have often seen myself as one of those frightened soldiers, not able to be the hero or great man that others may be – but still perfectly able to man my own post; to be useful in that small place of service that God has assigned to me. Or do I think that assignment unworthy, as if God were somehow unwise? What a glory and privilege it is to serve God wherever He would have me, content to fill a little space, as God ordains.[2]

 

[1] JRR Tolkein, The Return of the King (New York: Ballantine, 1965), p 199.

[2] As Anna Waring puts it in her hymn, “Father I Know that All My Life:”

I would not have the restless will
That hurries to and fro,
Seeking for some great thing to do
Or secret thing to know;
I would be treated as a child,
And guided where I go….

So I ask Thee for daily strength,
To none that ask denied,
And a mind to blend with outward life
While keeping at Thy side;
Content to fill a little space,
If Thou be glorified.

 

 

Rediscovering_Humility_Thumbnail__96135.1515507561.1280.1280

 

STUDY QUESTIONS FOR “REDISCOVERING HUMILITY”

click here to order the book from New Growth Press

 

All rights reserved, Christopher A. Hutchinson, 2018

Permission is hereby granted to reproduce these questions for individual or group use, provided credit is given, and no profit garnered from their use.

Click here to download this as a .pdf:  STUDY QUESTIONS FOR REDISCOVERING HUMILITY  Click here to download as an MS Word document: STUDY QUESTIONS FOR REDISCOVERING HUMILITY

 

 

CHAPTER ONE: Whatever Happened to Humility?

 

  1. Do you agree with the author that humility is at the very heart of the Christian faith? Why or why not?

 

  1. What most frustrates you about today’s Christian culture? How could a more explicit emphasis on humility lead to a healthier approach?

 

  1. What most frustrates you about your own Christian walk? How can an increased humility help point you in the right direction?

 

  1. Do you agree with the author’s assessment of the dangers that may accompany the phrase, “Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God?” Why or why not?

 

  1. In the closing lines from T.S. Eliot, what does it mean “to care and not to care,” and how does humility aid us in this balance?

 

 

CHAPTER TWO: Wide is the Road

 

  1. What is one way that you have sometimes tried to produce a false humility? What were your motives?

 

  1. What is one area in your life you are fairly humble about, by God’s grace? What is one area that you see pride creeping in more quickly?

 

  1. Have you ever been offended by someone else’s pride? Why did it offend you so much, and what can you learn about your own pride from taking offense?

 

  1. Have you ever “run yourself down” too much, and if so, why? How does the Gospel allow us to have a realistic view of our failings without causing us to despair?

 

  1. According to the author, what are the antidotes to these four false forms of humility?

 

 

CHAPTER THREE: Return of the Jester

 

  1. Where have you seen humility practiced well by a church or fellow Christian? How so?

 

  1. Which of the Biblical examples of humility that the author cites most inspire you? Why?

 

  1. Which of the sample questions of how humility should inform our lives most hits home for you? Why?

 

  1. What was a time in your life when you pursued something good, but forgot to do it with Christ’s help, depending upon His work as central? What was the result?

 

  1. Which part of the prayer at the end of the chapter most strikes you as needful for your life? Why?

 

 

CHAPTER FOUR: Lest Anyone Boast

 

  1. What is the first fruit you look for when you consider what it means to be a good or growing Christian? Why?

 

  1. According to Isaiah 57, where does God dwell? How does this reflect the truth of the Gospel? With whom does God apparently not dwell? Does God in fact dwell with you?

 

  1. In what ways in your life have you been like the praying Pharisee of Luke 18, and in what ways have you been like the Publican?

 

  1. How wide do you believe the gap is between God’s holiness and your own? How does grasping the breadth of that gap assist us in seeing our need for grace?

 

  1. Had you ever before noticed how Paul goes straight from justification by faith alone to humility as his first application? If not, why do you think that was?

 

  1. According to I Corinthians, who normally makes up the majority of the Church? If you are not one of these, is there any hope for you? Why?

 

  1. What is the connection between a salvation that is by grace alone, and God alone receiving all the glory for our salvation? How does that help our growth in humility?

 

 

CHAPTER FIVE: Hope for a Fool

 

  1. Do you believe it is possible that one religion may be the only true way? If not, why not?

 

  1. What has God proclaimed as true in His word that you simply do not want to believe, and yet humbly submit to it?

 

  1. When is a time in your life that you trusted your own opinion too much instead of keeping an open mind?

 

  1. Why must God work on our hearts as well as our minds if we are to come to a knowledge of the truth? How does Proverbs 1:7 reflect this?

 

  1. What is a time when you were in fact correct about something, but did not express that truth humbly, and thus ended up doing more harm than good?

 

  1. What is an area of doctrine or interpretation of God’s providence about which you have been too inflexible, not allowing enough room for mystery or disagreement?

 

 

CHAPTER SIX: Not Unto Us

 

1. When you think of what it means to grow in grace, what first comes to mind? Why?

 

  1. What is a way you can become more childlike in your faith, even as you seek to grow in Christian maturity?

 

  1. What is an area in your life that you can “pick up your cross daily” in order to better follow Jesus and so look like Him? What can you do to start?

 

  1. Why is it important to see both Christ’s glory and his humiliation in the offices of Prophet, Priest and King? Which side should more characterize our lives now? Why?

 

  1. Which aspect of Christ’s character outlined in this chapter would you like to see more fleshed out in your life? Why?

 

  1. According to the author, what does it mean to rest in Christ’s humility? Why is this important to remember?

 

 

CHAPTER SEVEN: Bold Nobodies

 

  1. When is a time that you “invited yourself up” before it was time or tried hard to work your way into an inner ring? What were the results?

 

  1. Which of Sharrett’s list of pride’s hidden recesses most hits home for you? How can you better address and repent of it?

 

  1. What is one way that you need to abase yourself more before God? What is the one aspect/talent of your life of which you are most proud or defensive?

 

  1. When is a time where you failed to follow Christ as you should, but only to discover afterwards that you actually grew in a greater meekness and love for Him as a result?

 

  1. Where is a place where God has gifted you and used you for good, but for which you are reluctant to thank Him for or take proper joy?

 

  1. How does the Gospel cause us to be both humble and bold at the same time?

 

 

CHAPTER EIGHT: Seeking the City to Come

  1. What is your eschatological position, and how have you let humility inform what you believe about the trajectory of the world and the Second Coming of Christ?

 

  1. How does the hope of heavenly reward affect the way that you treat others?

 

  1. Where in today’s church have you seen an “over-realized eschatology?” How does Baxter’s quote help us keep things in balance?

 

  1. As the hymn puts it, when have you seen God give you “days of gladness?” How does that temper your attitude when He also ordains for you “days of sadness?”

 

  1. How does your personal suffering point you to your true, heavenly hope?

 

  1. Why did Paul boast in his weaknesses? How do your weaknesses and suffering remind you to cast your hope on Christ alone? Give an example.

 

  1. Why does Christian humility ultimately end in an uplifting and glorious result? How does this knowledge keep you going through your valleys?

 

 

CHAPTER NINE: Tales from the Lower Totem Pole

 

  1. Which of the five listed areas of serving others do you need to most grow in? Which are you already pretty good at, by God’s grace?

 

  1. Who are some folks above and/or below you to whom you can show greater humility?  How, practically, will you plan to do that, with God’s help?

 

  1. Why is it important to serve those who cannot pay you back? What might that look like in your life?

 

  1. What is a way you have let worldly thinking influence the way you have judged someone else’s worth, even in church ministry?

 

  1. Do you agree with the author’s application of humility to how social status should be approached in light of such passages as I Peter 2 and Philemon? Why or why not?

 

  1. What is a way you can apply humility to cross-cultural relationships in your life and help heal the racial divide that has often plagued our society?

 

 

CHAPTER TEN: The Assembly of Egos

 

  1. Do you agree with the author that humility normatively requires formal membership in a local, visible church? Why or why not?

 

  1. How can a departure from the three simple Means of Grace distract our churches from growth in humility? What does it mean that pride feeds the eyes?

 

  1. In which of the three Means of Grace does your church most show its humble reliance upon God? Which of the three could it pursue more humbly? How can you help?

 

  1. How does active church discipline help keep us humble both individually, and as congregations? If you were confronted by your church leaders regarding a serious sin, how do you think you would respond?

 

  1. Do you agree with the author’s take on James 5, and its connection to church discipline, even though it is primarily addressing physical illness? Why or why not?

 

  1. If you are a church leader, in what ways have you sometimes promoted your own church brand rather than Christ alone? What can you do to repent of that?

 

 

CHAPTER ELEVEN: Like Men Sentenced to Death

 

  1. Do you agree with the author that the primary goal of Christian leadership ought to be growth in humility? Why or why not?

 

  1. Why does Paul commend Timothy and Epaphroditus in Philippians 2? What did they actually accomplish? How do they illustrate the famous, earlier section of Philippians 2?

 

  1. Why does Paul say that true leaders of his day were like “scum and dregs,” at the end of the parade? What do you look most look for in a Christian leader today?

 

  1. Do you agree with the author about academic titles and honors being used sparingly in the Church? If so, how could this application go awry if we are not careful?

 

  1. How does your church treat children, and how well does that treatment reflect the Gospel of grace?

 

  1. How well does your church’s public image reflect the full priesthood of believers which make up the congregation? Are some leaders elevated too much? How can you show your leaders proper honor without robbing Christ of His glory?

 

  1. Why is it important for the cause of humility that there be a plurality of leaders within a church? If you are leader, how can you be more thankful for the different gifts and emphases that other leaders bring to your congregation?

 

CHAPTER TWELVE: The Assembly of Fools

 

  1. Where have you felt the sweetness of Christian unity most? What made it so sweet?

 

  1. Where have you seen church unity strain or even break apart? What was the cause?

 

  1. How does Ephesians 4:1-6 provide a clue as to how Christian unity can be kept? Why is it important that Ephesians 1-3 precede Ephesians 4-6? What is the glue between grace and unity, and where have you seen that practiced well in this regard?

 

  1. What role do creeds and confessions play in safeguarding Christian unity? How can denominations actually aid unity in the context of Christian freedom?

 

  1. Give an example when you may have turned a “twig doctrine” into a “trunk doctrine,” and thus strained unity with fellow believers. Give an example of when you stood for the truth of a “trunk” or “branch” doctrine, even though it may have caused some tension.

 

  1. Even when there is the need for doctrinal disagreement, what are some practical ways we can still let humility be our guide, and thus promote our spiritual unity in Christ?

 

 

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: Turning Woes to Blessings

 

  1. How can you do a better job of “becoming weak to the weak” in your evangelism?

 

  1. What is a way your church shows a Gospel humility in the way it conducts worship? Is there anything that distracts from Christ being central to your worship?

 

  1. How can we confront our culture’s sins humbly, without backing down from Biblical truth? Over whom does the Church have authority and how does that help us with this?

 

  1. What are some ways that you have practiced your righteousness to be seen by men?

 

  1. Does your church do anything which promotes pride in giving, prayer or fasting? How can you pray publicly in a way that is sincere and does not draw attention to yourself?

 

  1. How does humility help our churches become refuges of grace in a weary world?

 

 

CHAPTER FOURTEEN: Turning Factories into Gardens

 

  1. What are some other markers of Christian growth that have sometimes supplanted humility as central in today’s Church?

 

  1. How can church planting help a growing congregation to remain humble? In what ways might it actually feed its pride?

 

  1. How does supporting foreign missions reflect the humility of Christ? In what ways might it actually feed a church’s pride?

 

  1. In what way does your church reflect a garden cultivating godliness and humility as foremost, and in what way does it more reflect the factory mindset of our culture?

 

  1. Now that you have finished the book, in what ways are you now different, and in what ways are you just the same you were before? Are you content to keep your royal robes hidden until Christ’s return?

 

Rediscovering_Humility_Thumbnail__96135.1515507561.1280.1280

 

TOP TEN REASONS I WROTE “REDISCOVERING HUMILITY”

click here to see a Sample and the Table of Contents

 

1) Humility is the chief Christian virtue.

This is the primary thesis of the book, and I try to make a convincing case for it from Scripture, that the need for humility can be found on every page.  At the very least, meekness plays a prominent role in Jesus’ teachings, explicitly so in at least three places (Matthew 23: Luke 14; Luke 18), which forms the organizing principle of my book (Humility Found, Humility Embraced, Humility Applied).

 

2) Humility is almost entirely neglected in our current Christian culture.

Of course, this depends which culture one observes, since there is hardly one monolithic Christian culture. But in terms of the speakers and conferences and churches that get the most media attention, humility is rarely mentioned in either content — or in the manner by which their ministries are promoted. In 1963, Harry Blamires contended that we had lost the concept of “A Christian Mind.” I contend much the same thing about humility: it rarely crosses our public Christian minds at all. At best it is an afterthought, or worse, an act that is put on. That is why I also address false forms of humility in Chapter Two, something I have not seen much addressed in other books on the subject.

 

3) Humility is always our greatest friend, and pride our greatest enemy.

This is a quote from John Stott (see p. 223 of my book), and simply a reminder that whatever challenges we face in life – illness, conflict, success, sin – that it always benefits us to face those with as much humility as we can muster, and to do all we can to repent of our pride. When we do that, we may pay a price outwardly – losing an argument, for example – but we will always be better off in the end, because we will have grown in grace and become more like Jesus.

 

4) Humility means holding to Truth firmly and yet somehow, meekly.

In our day, a great threat to true humility is the idea that all truth is relative, and that it is arrogant to proclaim anything as true with certainty. Progressive and Emergent Christians often fall into this trap. But in fact, true humility embraces God’s Word as a child receives milk from his or her mother (cf. Psalm 131, I Peter 2:2-3). And yet – and this is where conservative Christians often fail – we most proclaim truth humbly in a manner which reinforces rather than undermines the kindness of the Gospel (cf. I Peter 3:15).  I tackle the challenge of truth and humility in Chapter Five.

 

5) Humility stems from the logic of salvation by Grace Alone.

I argue that humility is in fact, the first and greatest application of a salvation which is by grace through faith alone. At least, it is the first thing Paul mentions in such places as Romans 3:27 and Ephesians 2:9.  So why then do we often rush on to other applications first, or judge our growth in grace by other measurements as somehow more telling? Chapter Four is devoted to this theme, and a good one for skeptics and seekers to consider.

 

6) Humility should always be the chief goal of Christian discipleship.

Many schools of discipleship are centered upon practical steps we can take to strengthen our Christian walks. While this is very helpful, if they do not put humility at the center of their programs, then there is the danger of producing “strong,” pharisaical Christians, rather than those who know their own weakness, and thus depend on Christ for all of their good.  Humility, then, must not be just one more aspect of our discipleship, but its very goal.

 

7) Humility means living for God’s glory, not our own.

While this may seem obvious, it is the central question of the Christian life. Believers are already saved, our eternities secured by the blood of Jesus. So how we will spend the rest of the time God has allotted us here on earth? Humility turns pursuing God’s glory first a joy rather than a burden. Are we greater than our Master? Humility helps us to want nothing more than to look more like Him, day by day, year by year, until we reach our final rest.

 

8) Humility is to live as Christ, always putting others above ourselves.

What could be more important than imitating our Savior? And what is a better indicator of that imitation than growth in humility, seeing our lives as ones of sacrifice and service, modeled upon the God who loved us and gave Himself for us? Philippians 2, I Peter 2 and other passages serve as our guides through this, remembering always to first rest in Christ’s work on our behalf! That, too, is humility!

 

9) Humility ought to characterize not just Christians, but congregations.

One of the unique features of my book is my attempt to apply humility not only to  individuals but to churches, based in part on twenty years of pastoral experience. Page-wise, this takes up almost one half of the book (Chapters 9-14). Other fine books have been offered up on humility in recent years, but none to my knowledge have addressed how our churches can be humble together in the way we worship, do evangelism, reach out to the needy, plant other churches, and so forth. I try to make humility very specific and concrete in these chapters, suggesting many practical applications. Not all will agree with every one of them, and that is OK.  After all, the goal is to listen to and sharpen one another, as we each work out what humility should then look like.

 

10) Humility is the link between grace and unity in the Church.

One of the most common issues I have to deal with as a pastor and a presbytery member are issues of doctrinal purity versus breadth of fellowship. There are no easy answers, but Ephesians 4:1-6 shows us that humility is a wonderful tool to help us keep the balance between truth and unity, doctrine and love. Chapter Twelve is dedicated to this question.

 

So that’s it!  Again, I hope and pray that this book is helpful to a whole range of people — seekers, average Christians struggling to follow Christ, and seminarians and pastors as they consider how to better lead their congregations in the way of Christ.

 

 

Rediscovering_Humility_Thumbnail__96135.1515507561.1280.1280

 

 

A Short Reader’s Guide to “Rediscovering Humility”

click here to see the Table of Contents, Foreword, Preface and Chapter One

I think it can be fairly argued that in some ways, I tried to do much with my book.  What I did try to do is make each chapter unique, so that I am not just repeating myself for fourteen chapters. I also tried to write a book that would appeal to various kinds of people all in different places on their spiritual walks.

What this may mean, however, is that certain readers will find some chapters more useful than others. So it would not hurt my feelings at all if readers skim or skip some of the chapters. The idea, after all, is to grow in humility, not finish a book!

So if that is you, here is a suggested reader’s guide, for at least three categories of readers.  For an outline of the book with chapter titles, please see my earlier post from January 18.  (Or:  click here to “Look Inside” at the Table of Contents, etc.)

1) Seekers and Skeptics ~ First, thanks for picking this book up! I would read chapters 1-5 to explore the Christian case for humility. Chapters 1-3 are my argument that much of what passes for Christianity in America these days is not a good representative of its Founder. Instead, we must go to Scripture. Chapter 4 explains how the Gospel requires and leads to humility as the central virtue of the Christian life. Chapter 5 explores humility’s intersection with the pursuit of truth, a major stumbling block in our day, since many skeptics believe it is arrogant to proclaim Jesus as the unique Savior. Then, if you are at all intrigued or challenged, then perhaps go on to read Chapters 6-9, and if further interested, consider the last section on humility in the Church.

2) Christian Leaders ~ If you have been around the Christian faith awhile and are already pretty convinced and catechized about the need for humility, then of course, I would like you to read the whole book, since each chapter builds on the previous ones. But the real meat of application begins in Chapters 8-9, I think, and then especially expands in the section on the Church in Chapters 10-14. Push through the briefer and more basic chapters early on to get to these. I don’t expect you to agree with all my suggested applications, but I suspect there are at least a few you have not considered, or realize your church could do a better job pursuing.

3) Your Average Proud Christian ~ So, you know humility is a good thing, but you also realize that you struggle with it. You want to follow Jesus better in this virtue, and let it permeate your life more. Well then, Chapters 4-9 are for you. Chapters 1-3 may set you up well to see the need across the church, generally, and Chapter 2 may especially guard you against some missteps. But delve into that middle section of the book and then let that take you into finding your part in this wider experiment in humility that we call the Church in the last section of the book.

Again, whether you skim through it, or pick it apart, I pray it is useful to you. Thank you for reading it, and may God help us all in this pursuit to His glory.

 

 

 

 

Rediscovering_Humility_Thumbnail__96135.1515507561.1280.1280

It is a great honor to have so many friends and mentors in my life agree to add their endorsement for my little book on humility. click here

It is incredibly encouraging, and a reminder that following after Christ is truly a community endeavor.

The provocative Foreword is by Dr. David Wells of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, one of my favorite professors there. I am grateful for his support!

Here are the other folks who agreed to blurb for the book, listed in the order they appeared in my life, because the book reflects all these folks’ influence and kindness to me.  Please note, that I am NOT listing all of their many titles and distinctions!

 

Dr. Jeff Hutchinson, Mission Anabaino (brother)

Ms. Paige Britton, Grass Roots Theological Library (high school friend & a proofer of the manuscript)

Dr. Rob Norris, Fourth Presbyterian, Bethesda, MD (first evangelical pastor)

Dr. Shawn Wright, professor,Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (college friend)

Dr. David Bowen, Second Presbyterian, Nashsville, TN (college pastor in Durham, NC)

Dr. George Marsden, Notre Dame professor emeritus (professor at Duke)

Dr. Will Willimon, Duke Divinity School and retired UMC bishop (chaplain while at Duke)

Dr. Terry Johnson, Independent Presbyterian, Savannah, GA (pastor while in Army, and the one who “sent” me off to seminary)

Dr. Joel White, Giessen School of Theology, Germany (seminary friend)

Rev. Roland Barnes, Trinity Presbyterian, Statesboro, GA, (I served as Roland’s associate pastor for 7 years)

Dr. Tom Gardner, English professor, Virginia Tech (a current fellow elder at Grace Covenant Presbyterian in Blacksburg, VA)

Rev. JR Foster, RUF Area Coordinator (first RUF minister at VT)

Ms. SharDavia Walker, Campus Outreach, Lynchburg, VA (author & former member)

Dr. Dave Silvernail, Potomac Hills Presbyterian, professor at RTS-DC (friend)

Dr. Guy Waters, professor, at RTS-Jackson (friend)

Dr. Dominic Aquila, President, New Geneva Seminary (friend)

Dr. Stephen Estock, Director PCA Discipleship Ministries (friend)

Mr. Richard Doster, editor, ByFaith magazine (friend)

Rev. Joe Holland, Christ Presbyterian, Culpeper, VA (friend, editor at Ligonier)

 

I am extraordinarily grateful for the support from all of these sisters and brothers and from New Growth Press. Truly a team effort! SDG!

 

 

Library, Pemboke VA

 

I encountered an excellent Twitter thread by @AmyMantravadi written on April 9, 2018, contrasting Pride and Humility.  Twitter at its best.

The thread was thoroughly Biblical in its ethics.  And so for fun, I listed the first New Testament verse or brief passage I could think of to prove or illustrate each pairing. Some were obvious, as they were direct quotations; others just the first example I could think of — free association.  So, here, of course, I am attempting to prooftext positively, not in the pejorative sense that the word is sometimes used.

I am posting it here, simply because it is too long for a Twitter thread.  I thought this might be useful for a Sunday School or Bible Study handout if someone wants to use it.

Again, all the pairings are the work of @AmyMantravadi.  I just added the Scripture texts.

 

Pride says, “Let me teach you.”
Humility says, “I will listen.”

James 1:19

Pride says, “You hurt me!”
Humility says, “Did I hurt you?”

James 3:13-18

Pride says, “God is on my side!”
Humility says, “Am I on God’s side?”

James 4:4-10

Pride says, “I have rights.”
Humility says, “I am a sinner saved by grace.”

Romans 3:27

Pride says, “It’s all your fault.”
Humility says, “Is it I, Lord?”

Matthew 26:22

Pride says, “Thank God I’m not like them!”
Humility says, “Have mercy on me, a sinner.”

Luke 18:9-14

Pride says, “I built that.”
Humility says, “The Lord built that.”

I Corinthians 3:7

Pride says, “I must work out my salvation.”
Humility says, “He works in me.”

Philippians 2:13

Pride says, “Who must I love?”
Humility says, “I must love all.”

Romans 12:14-19

Pride says, “I have arrived.”
Humility says, “I need grace.”

I Corinthians 4:8

Pride says, “You take the first step.”
Humility says, “I’ll take the first step.”

Philemon 1:12

Pride says, “An eye for an eye.”
Humility says, “Here is my cloak.”

Matthew 5:40

Pride says, “How great is my knowledge!”
Humility says, “How great is my ignorance!”

I Corinthians 8:1

Pride says, “The Church needs me.”
Humility says, “I need the Church.”

I Corinthians 12:14-27

Pride says, “I forgave you before.”
Humility says, “I forgive you again.”

Matthew 18:22

Pride says, “I need not the sacraments.”
Humility says, “I need them like daily bread.”

John 6:51

Pride says, “Confess to me.”
Humility says, “Let’s confess to one another.”

James 5:16

Pride says, “I know all.”
Humility says, “God knows all.”

Psalm 131

Pride says, “There is no pain like my pain.”
Humility says, “There is no pain like Christ’s pain.”

I Peter 2:21-23

Pride says, “Good riddance.”
Humility says, “I pray you return.”

II Corinthians 2:6-8

Pride says, “Where are you wrong?”
Humility says, “Where do we agree?”

Philippians 4:2

Pride says, “I must not be tainted.”
Humility says, “I must serve Christ.”

Galatians 2:11-21

Pride says, “I’m surrounded by hypocrites!”
Humility says, “I am a hypocrite.”

I Timothy 1:15

Pride says, “Here’s what you owe me.”
Humility says, “What do I owe you?”

I Corinthians 6:7

Pride says, “Listen to my wisdom.”
Humility says, “Listen to God’s Word.”

James 1:22

Pride says, “Who must I condemn?”
Humility says, “Who must I commend?”

Philippians 2:29-30

Pride says, “I messed up.”
Humility says, “I sinned.”

Romans 7

Pride says, “Me!”
Humility says, “God!”

Psalm 115:1